Crucifying the Flesh

D e n y
Y o u r s e l f . . .

The Jesus Question

The title of this painting by Anthony Falbo is a reference to Galatians 5:24: “And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.”

This theme rings throughout Paul’s other writings as well:

  • “For we know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves to sin.” (Romans 6:6)
  • “. . . if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live.” (Romans 8:13)
  • “I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me.” (Galatians 2:20)
  • “May I never boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world.” (Galatians 6:14)

Crucifying the Flesh by Anthony Falbo Anthony…

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Jack Kerouac, Music Journalist

Stephanie Nikolopoulos

When Jack Kerouac went off to Columbia University, he told people he was going to be a journalist.  His father, Leo Kerouac, was a printer in Lowell, who owned a print shop called Spotlight Print.  Leo handled printing for some of the big businesses in New England, and also did a bit of writing of his own.  This inspired Ti Jean, as little Jack was called.  He used to lay on the floor, creating his own little newspapers and comics.

In school in New York, first at Horace Mann prep school and then at Columbia, Kerouac contributed to the school newspapers.  The writing he did for the papers would best be described as music journalism.  He soaked in all the great 1940s bebop of Harlem and wrote jazz reviews.

There was no Pitchfork at the time.  Rolling Stone magazine wasn’t founded until 1967.  Even many of today’s popular jazz…

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John Mayer – I Will Be Found (Lost At Sea)

 

It doesn’t matter where you roam
When no one’s left to call you home
I might have strained a bit too far
I’m countin’ all the moonlit stars

I’m a little lost at sea
I’m a little birdie in a big old tree
Ain’t nobody looking for me
Here out on the highway

But I will be found
I will be found
When my time comes down
I will be found

Somedays, I think it’s all okay
Some nights, I throw it all away
I saw her face and I could tell
My ghost had left the town as well

I’m a little lost at sea
I’m a little birdie in a big old tree
Ain’t nobody looking for me
Here out on the highway

But I will be found
I will be found
When my time comes down
I will be found

I’m a little lost at sea
I’m a little birdie in a big old tree
Ain’t nobody looking for me
Here out on the highway

Baby, I’m a runaway train
Baby, I’m a feather in a hurricane
Maybe it’s a long grey game
But maybe that’s a good thing

‘Cause I will be found
I will be found
When my time comes down
I will be found

So I keep runnin’ ’til my run is gone
Keep on ridin’ ’til I see that dawn
And I will be found
I will be found

 

Jack Kerouac Dropped Out of College. So What?

Stephanie Nikolopoulos

Is genius born or created?  By now everyone has read, or at least heard, about how Steve Jobs dropped out of Reed College and went on to become the cofounder of Apple and one of the most important entrepreneurs of our time.  Perhaps less known is the fact that Jobs continued to audit classes at Reed.  He actually credited a calligraphy course he took as having a major impact on the Mac.  When I was taking a shuttle from the San Francisco airport to my hotel out in Walnut Creek, I had a midnight conversation with a businessman who had read the biography on Jobs and told me about how the computer genius’ interest in art was fundamental to his vision for building a successful brand.

Back in September, Flavorwire posted an article called “10 Famous Authors Who Dropped Out of School.”  This is what they wrote about Jack Kerouac:

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